Author: Hogan Assessments

Study Shows Shared Personal Values a Better Predictor of Trump Supporters Than Political Attitudes


* This article originally appeared on Business Wire. A recent study conducted by Hogan Assessments Chief Science Officer, Dr. Ryne Sherman, shows that personal values were an even stronger predictor of support for President Donald Trump than political affiliation or ideology in the 2016 US presidential primary. The study examined data gathered from 1,825 individuals… Read more »

Talent — Does It Come from Desire, Ability, or Both?


*In this guest post, Melvyn Payne, Development Director at Advanced People Strategies, takes a look at the challenges facing Talent Management. It is no surprise to see hard-working, collaborative individuals with great social skills emerging as potential leaders and being nominated for talent development programmes. In fact, it makes a welcome change to some of… Read more »

Bob Hogan and Ryne Sherman: Briefing Socioanalytic Theory


Socioanalytic theory draws on key ideas of Charles Darwin, Sigmund Freud, and George Herbert Mead to explain why people act as they do. All three writers noted that humans evolved as group living animals; we also know that all groups contain status hierarchies and myths about their origins and purpose. This suggests that the big… Read more »

VIDEO: Bob Hogan on the Bright Side of Personality

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Developed in 1980, the Hogan Personality Inventory, which describes the bright side of personality, has aged like a fine wine. With a commitment to validity and reliability, Hogan’s flagship assessment is continuously updated and analyzed by our industry-leading research division. Whether your goal is to find the right hire or develop stronger leaders, assessing bright-side… Read more »

The HDS Turns 2 Million

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Hogan was the first personality assessment provider to recognize the value of assessing derailers, or dark side personality, with working adults. First launched in 1995, the Hogan Development Survey (HDS) measures 11 derailing tendencies that can impede career success and interpersonal effectiveness. In 1998, we were the first test publisher to develop a web-based assessment… Read more »

Scott Gregory Named New Hogan CEO

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Today, Hogan announced that Scott Gregory will assume the role of CEO, effective March 1, 2018. Current CEO, Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic has resigned and will leave the company on February 28, 2018. “Tomas’ tireless support of the business has been superb,” said Robert Hogan, Founder and President. “He will remain a close friend and valued member… Read more »

How Much ‘Psycho’ Is There in Modern Psychometics?

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This article was originally authored by Geoff Trickey for PCL in January 2018. The use of personality questionnaires has increased quite dramatically over recent years. Test development, publication and usage have benefitted considerably from the opportunities provided by the internet: once a process that relied very much on the professional expertise of the psychologists, personality… Read more »

Too Much Charisma Can Make Leaders Look Less Effective


*This article was authored by Jasmine Vergauwe, Bart Wille, Joeri Hofmans, Robert B. Kaiser, and Filip De Fruyt, and it was originally published by Harvard Business Review on September 26, 2017.   Conventional wisdom suggests that the most charismatic leaders are also the best leaders. Charismatic leaders have, for instance, the ability to inspire others toward higher levels of performance and to… Read more »

Are Your HiPos Overrated?


Most organizations across the globe make it a top priority to identify and develop high potential employees for leadership roles. Unfortunately, organizations large and small have struggled to recognize those with the most potential and, in many cases, select employees with very little potential at all. This is largely due to biases in the identification… Read more »

It’s the Company’s Job to Help Employees Learn


When Frederick Taylor published his pioneering principles of scientific management in 1912, the repetitive and mundane nature of most jobs required employees to think as little as possible. Breaking down each task into basic components and standardizing workers’ behaviors to eliminate choice and flexibility could help managers turn employees into productive machines, albeit with alienated… Read more »