Author: Hogan Assessments

Change

As it gets closer to the new year, most people are considering what resolutions they’ll make. An oft-quoted fact is most New Years resolutions are broken, yet we make them year after year. My least favorite time of year to go to the gym is in the first three weeks of January. Besides the overcrowding,… Read more »

Best Holiday Gifts for Your Employees

With the holidays around the corner, year-end also brings about the gift-shopping season. While we bang our head against the wall for new gift ideas every year, organizations are also constantly brainstorming new ways to reward their employees and show appreciation for their contributions. Historically, monetary compensation was the ultimate reward in the workplace. However,… Read more »

What is Good Judgment…Really?

Good judgment isn’t about being smart. It’s not even about making good decisions. The essence of good judgment is about learning from past mistakes. It’s about applying feedback to the next opportunity so as not to needlessly repeat blunders or continue to pursue a course that just isn’t panning out. It’s about remaining open to… Read more »

Q&A: Personality and Safety

For companies in every industry, worker safety is a major concern; companies spent billions of dollars a year on equipment and training aimed at creating a safer workforce. Yet, in 2013 alone, 4,405 U.S. workers died on the job. In this Q&A, Hogan consultant Kristen Switzer discusses the missing component in workplace safety – personality…. Read more »

Dysfunctional Team? It’s Your Fault

High-performing teams can provide an undeniable advantage over the competition. However, most managers will tell you that although it is easy to put together a team with great potential, they rarely perform at their maximum capacity. Why? Because you’re doing it wrong.

5 Ways Teams Fail

An unbalanced team can be an operational nightmare – projects stall, ideas dry up, and morale plummets. Fortunately, unbalanced teams manifest themselves in five predictable ways, each of which can be fixed by bringing in people to fill gaps, or reassigning people where too many individuals are trying to fill a role.